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Today Is National Nurses Day!

first_imgAmerican Nurses Association News:Today is National Nurses Day and marks the beginning of National Nurses Week, which ends May 12 on Florence Nightingale’s birthday. The nursing profession has been supported and promoted by the American Nurses Association (ANA) since 1896. Each of ANA’s state and territorial nurses associations promotes the nursing profession at the state and regional levels. Each conducts celebrations on these dates to recognize the contributions that nurses and nursing make to the community.The ANA supports and encourages National Nurses Week recognition programs through the state and district nurses associations, other specialty nursing organizations, educational facilities, and independent health care companies and institutions.A Brief History of National Nurses Week1953 Dorothy Sutherland of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare sent a proposal to President Eisenhower to proclaim a “Nurse Day” in October of the following year. The proclamation was never made.1954 National Nurse Week was observed from October 11-16. The year of the observance marked the 100th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s mission to Crimea. Representative Frances P. Bolton sponsored the bill for a nurse week. Apparently, a bill for a National Nurse Week was introduced in the 1955 Congress, but no action was taken. Congress discontinued its practice of joint resolutions for national weeks of various kinds.1972 Again a resolution was presented by the House of Representatives for the President to proclaim “National Registered Nurse Day.” It did not occur.1974 In January of that year, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) proclaimed that May 12 would be “International Nurse Day.” (May 12 is the birthday of Florence Nightingale.) Since 1965, the ICN has celebrated “International Nurse Day.”1974 In February of that year, a week was designated by the White House as National Nurse Week, and President Nixon issued a proclamation.1978 New Jersey Governor Brendon Byrne declared May 6 as “Nurses Day.” Edward Scanlan, of Red Bank, N.J., took up the cause to perpetuate the recognition of nurses in his state. Mr. Scanlan had this date listed in Chase’s Calendar of Annual Events. He promoted the celebration on his own.1981 ANA, along with various nursing organizations, rallied to support a resolution initiated by nurses in New Mexico, through their Congressman, Manuel Lujan, to have May 6, 1982, established as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”1982 In February, the ANA Board of Directors formally acknowledged May 6, 1982 as “National Nurses Day.” The action affirmed a joint resolution of the United States Congress designating May 6 as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”1982 President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation on March 25, proclaiming “National Recognition Day for Nurses” to be May 6, 1982.1990 The ANA Board of Directors expanded the recognition of nurses to a week-long celebration, declaring May 6 – 12, 1991, as National Nurses Week.1993 The ANA Board of Directors designated May 6-12 as permanent dates to observe National Nurses Week in 1994 and in all subsequent years.1996 The ANA initiated “National RN Recognition Day” May 6, 1996, to honor the nation’s indispensable registered nurses for their tireless commitment 365 days a year. The ANA encourages its state and territorial nurses associations and other organizations to acknowledge May 6, 1996 as “National RN Recognition Day.”1997 The ANA Board of Directors, at the request of the National Student Nurses Association, designated May 8 as National Student Nurses Day.Source: nursingworld.orglast_img read more

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Diana Secures First Gig for Its Newbuild

first_imgDiana Shipping Inc. has signed a time charter contract with RWE Supply & Trading GmbH, Essen, Germany, for one of its Capesize dry bulk vessels, “Hull No. BC18.0-50” (to be named “G. P. Zafirakis”). The gross charter rate is $25,250 per day, minus a 5% commission paid to third parties, for a period of minimum eighteen months to maximum twenty-two months.The charter is expected to commence upon delivery of the vessel to the company.The m/v G. P. Zafirakis is a 2014 built Capesize dry bulk vessel of approximately 180,000 dwt that the company entered into an agreement to purchase in June 2014. The vessel is now expected to be delivered by early August 2014.This employment is anticipated to generate approximately $13.6m of gross revenue for the minimum scheduled period of the time charter.[mappress]Press Release; July 7th, 2014last_img read more

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No choice for mental health clients

first_img Duncan Lennox , Harthills, Rotherham The letter from Hugh Barrett of the Legal Services Commission refers to the allocation of new matter starts according to ‘client demand’. He implies that the LSC are responding to client needs rather than the interests of solicitors. A clever approach but misleading. The allocation of matter starts ignores client choice totally. In mental health work, clients often instruct solicitors whom they have used before or who have been recommended. At the moment clients are generally able to select the solicitor of their choice. So if I used 60 matter starts last year it would have meant that 60 clients wanted mental health representation from me. Those 60 people were able to be represented by the solicitor of their choice. From October, my matter starts are going to be reduced (as are those of many other providers). If the level of client demands stays the same clients who want my service will not be able to get it but will be obliged to instruct another solicitor whom they have not picked as first choice. This is not about client choice. It ignores the interests of mental health clients who are a vulnerable section of the community. In future, they are likely to find that they are represented by somebody imposed on them by the LSC rather than the person they want.last_img read more

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The third degree

first_img Commercial imperative The vast majority of TPF is, of course, focused on commercial litigation. There are two main scenarios in which claimants will seek funding: the David and Goliath situation, where a small business cannot afford to bring the case without the funder’s support, which gives it equality of arms, and the risk-averse client, which is big enough to bring the case unaided but prefers to sacrifice some of its winnings in return for passing the parcel of risk. But while it is undoubtedly expanding, the funding market is relatively small at the moment. A back-of-envelope calculation by Perrin concludes that there is currently about £350m of capital in the UK funding market, available to finance both litigation and arbitration. That figure includes a £100m boost from the recent arrival of Burford, which entered the UK market in February by buying up after-the-event insurer FirstAssist. It intends to create a funding business on an ‘unrivalled scale’ on this side of the Atlantic, driven by Burford CEO Christopher Bogart’s belief that the UK is now ‘one of the most hospitable environments’ for third-party funding. Other recent arrivals on the scene include specialist private bank Investec and ‘alternative litigation funder’ Caprica, which is targeting disputes worth a minimum of £50,000 – much lower than traditional funders. In the current economic climate, there are obvious attractions to litigation as an area of investment, as it is not linked to the fortunes of the capital markets. The expectation is that more new entrants will come forth in the coming year, with capital flowing into the sector. Funders are certainly optimistic about the future of their industry. Neil Purslow of Therium says: ‘We expect to see the market grow in size in terms of the numbers of cases funded, and the amounts of funding being deployed. Therium is seeing a steep increase in interest in funding, year on year. I expect to see more use of funding by substantial corporate clients, trustees, charities and public bodies managing their risk and cashflow. There is also greater awareness of funding in international arbitration, which will be a growth area.’ Ben Hawkins, managing director of Commercial Litigation Funding Ltd, adds that insolvency litigation in particular will be a growth area. He says: ‘Insolvency lends itself well to litigation funding. We have seen a spate of VAT fraud cases and private enforcement of competition claims.’ For Woodsford’s Jonathan Barnes, Lord Justice Jackson’s plans to scrap recoverability of after-the-event insurance premiums could provide a new role for funders. ‘The end of recoverability will be significant,’ he predicts. ‘Under the contingent/deferred model, all ATE insurance premiums are ultimately paid by losing defendants. ‘When recoverability goes, insurers may want premiums paid up front, as with all other types of insurance. Solicitors who previously ran cases on 100% conditional fee agreements coupled with contingent/deferred ATE insurance will have to find a funder to pay the cash cost of the premium, or to indemnify the client in respect of the adverse cost risk.’ Hawkins adds: ‘If the LASPO bill does remove recoverability of ATE premiums and success fees, we expect to see funders competing on cost and developing innovative models to ensure that those deductions from damages are minimised.’ Others believe TPF will become accessible for a greater volume of cases. Solicitor and former Law Society president Michael Napier says: ‘As the market matures, the threshold that funders currently apply to cases will gradually reduce from its current high level (usually seven figures) to lower-value claims, particularly as lawyers become more creative in blended fee arrangements and offering fixed fees. The other factor of course is the yet-to-be-seen impact of alternative business structures, with the skills to commoditise even the resolution of commercial disputes.’ The use of TPF may be on the up, but it is hard to tell just how many disputes are actually being backed by funders at the moment, as they rarely publicise their involvement in a case to the outside world. Often this is because of the client, who does not want publicity in relation to their dispute; but funders are also wary of being subject to an application for security for costs if their involvement becomes public. This lack of transparency does little to improve the somewhat opaque image of the sector. The Code of Conduct of the Association of Litigation Funders All funders who sign up to the voluntary code must: Deciphering the code Others see DBAs in a different light, believing them to be more opportunity than threat as far as funders are concerned. Hawkins says: ‘DBAs will move the UK funding model further towards the US, and we see this as potentially a good thing. What is often overlooked is that the idea of a DBA involves solicitors “funding” the cost of disbursements and insurance. ‘At a simple level, this could suggest a drop in business for funders, as law firms compete to fund their own cases. But every firm has a threshold at which it will become uncomfortable with work-in-progress exposure, so solicitors’ firms will become our clients, and funders are more likely to get involved in portfolios rather than single cases.’ The prospect of spreading the risk of a DBA or funding up-front ATE premiums or expenses, and the comfort of knowing that a funder has signed up to a transparent code of conduct, may lead to more solicitors choosing to engage with funders. But funding is not necessarily that easy to come by. The first point to note is that third-party funders are pretty cautious about the type of case they will take on. They will typically look for 70% prospects of success; but given the intrinsically uncertain nature of litigation, percentages are not that helpful. Funders like disputes where liability is strong, and the argument is over quantum. Perrin, who is chair of funder Calunius Capital, says it is not necessarily about wanting a case that will win in court. ‘We would look at whether the case looks like it will settle; are the dynamics there that would lead to an early settlement?’ he says. Positive indicators might be a situation in which the defendant does not gain any financial benefit from delaying proceedings, or where there is a business relationship that needs to be resuscitated. It is a ‘wide spectrum of factors’, he says, adding that funders will often get involved in arbitration rather than litigation, as law firm arbitration partners tend to be more open to the concept of funding. Once funding has been secured, there are other pitfalls that should be avoided in dealing with funders. Amey says: ‘Some funders insist on exclusivity periods in order for them to complete their due diligence. In principle, this is a legitimate request where the funder is genuinely going to spend hard cash on investigating the case. However, exclusivity periods are requested and accepted too readily. ‘Legal representatives need to carefully consider whether it is in a client’s best interests to exclude alternative options, especially where there is time pressure, given the time it takes to complete due diligence. ‘Moreover, approaching funders and insurers consecutively may not be a great idea from a presentation point of view, as a prior rejection will perturb would-be funders. A simultaneous search of the funding market is always the safest option for clients, at least until such time as an exclusivity period is clearly justifiable.’ Purslow adds that exclusivity ‘can backfire on a live piece of litigation if the funder decides not to proceed’. Clients tend to focus too much on the ‘headline commercial arrangements’, suggests Hawkins, without considering how the funders plan to interact with the legal team and insurers. He says: ‘What happens, for example, if the budget needs to increase, or a solicitor moves firms? Funders’ experience of these issues is just as important to the smooth running of a case as their ability to devise commercial terms at the outset.’ With endorsement from the senior judiciary, up-front ATE premiums and the introduction of DBAs, the stars are aligned to suggest a bright future for TPF; and solicitors will have every reason to get closer to the industry. As Perrin says: ‘The sector is going to expand. It will either be driven by lawyers’ own business acumen, or, as awareness increases, it will be driven by client demand. Ultimately, clients will force their lawyers to develop a sophisticated understanding of funding.’ Rachel Rothwell is editor of Litigation Funding magazine, which provides in-depth coverage of third-party funding and costs. LF publishes an up-to-date list of funders and insurerscenter_img Shadowy image Take reasonable steps to ensure the litigant receives independent advice on the terms of the funding agreement, which can be from the solicitor instructed in the dispute; Not take any steps that may cause the solicitor or barrister to breach their professional duties; Not seek to influence the solicitor or barrister instructed in the dispute to cede control to the funder; Maintain adequate financial resources to meet its funding obligations for at least 36 months; Ensure the funding agreement sets out the extent to which a funder may provide input into settlement discussions; Only terminate its agreement if it reasonably ceases to be satisfied about the merits of a dispute; reasonably believes that the dispute is no longer commercially viable; or reasonably believes there has been a material breach of the agreement by the litigant; and If there is a dispute between the funder and litigant about a settlement or termination of the agreement, a binding opinion will be obtained from a QC jointly instructed or nominated by the chair of the Bar Council What has done much to clear away the shadowy image of third-party funding, however, has been the launch last November of a new code of conduct to shine a light on how funders must operate. A new Association of Litigation funders (ALF) was set up, along with the voluntary code to which all members of the association must adhere. The code of conduct is intended to pin a badge of respectability on the sector and, as Harbour’s Susan Dunn said at its launch, shows that third-party funding has finally ‘emerged from the shadows’. Crucially, the contents of the code were endorsed by Lord Justice Jackson at its launch. The judge is an advocate of TPF, which he believes can be ‘beneficial’ to access to justice, provided safeguards are in place. Jackson had called for a voluntary code of conduct for funders in his final report on civil justice reform, suggesting that the heavier tool of statutory regulation should not be considered until this nascent market matures. In the House of Lords in February, justice minister Lord McNally rejected Thomas’s call for the government to regulate TPF, saying that it preferred to see how the voluntary code developed first. So the code has successfully shielded the industry from government regulation that might have stifled its development, and it seems unlikely that government will revisit this approach for a few years. But while ALF has now issued applications for membership, it has yet to appoint its first member; this development is expected soon. Those involved in the industry are highly supportive of the new code, which they believe will give solicitors more confidence in selecting a funder. Peter Smith, managing director of FirstAssist, adds: ‘It’s worth noting that the adoption of the code is one of the first Jackson reforms to be implemented; the private sector has responded swiftly.’ But while the code is undoubtedly a benefit for TPF, it took a lot of blood, sweat and tears to bring it into existence. Negotiations on its wording, chaired by Napier on behalf of the Civil Justice Council, began as far back as 2008, and the code went through 12 drafts in the six months running up to its publication – with final changes being made right up to the day before it was launched at the Royal Courts of Justice. While the US Chamber of Commerce argues that the code is merely voluntary and has no real sanction for non-compliance, in practice all the main funders are expected to sign up to it, and risk being thrown out of the ALF if they fail to adhere to it; which would be distinctly bad for business. With Jackson’s approval so crucial to the code’s success, the final version gave the judge everything that he was looking for (see box). It ensures a funder has enough cash to fund a case for three years, restricts the circumstances in which it can pull out of litigation, and prevents it from taking control of the case. But funders are conscious that the capital adequacy requirements imposed on them by the code will place them at a disadvantage once solicitors start using damages-based agreements from next April. When a solicitor acts under a DBA, they will effectively be a funder of litigation; but unlike third-party funders, they will not have to prove that they have the finances in place to fund their cases. Matthew Amey of broker TheJudge says: ‘Funders will be competing with solicitors who, assuming they embrace the opportunity to fund cases through DBAs (which is quite an assumption), will effectively be indistinguishable from funders. But from the funders’ perspective, solicitors will have a number of advantages, in that they control the client; they will not be liable for adverse costs (unlike funders); and they won’t be subject to capital adequacy requirements. ‘While co-funding and other co-operative strategies will develop with the introduction of DBAs, there is a possibility that contingency fees will slow down the growth of the third-party funding market. In practice though, there is probably room for both in the short- to medium-term.’ In the House of Lords recently, a Liberal Democrat peer pointed out that third-party funding used to be ‘both a crime and a civil tort’. But unusually for a practice that was previously considered illegal, third-party funding is now basking in the warm glow of judicial approval; and while the sun is shining, it is making all the hay it can. Funders have used their new voluntary code of conduct like a stiff brush to sweep away any prospect of statutory regulation (for a few years, at least). There have been a gaggle of new entrants into the UK funding market; the latest being the world’s largest funder Burford, which has poured an extra £100m or so into the glistening pool of available capital. And next April’s Jackson reforms are expected to provide fertile ground in which funders will enjoy greater yields than ever. So why is third-party funding so controversial? TPF is essentially the investment in litigation by funders who have no interest in the case, other than to make a profit on their investment. As Liberal Democrat peer Lord Thomas of Gresford pointed out in a February House of Lords debate (in which he was attempting to introduce statutory regulation into the sector through an amendment to the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders bill), this used to be considered ‘maintenance and champerty’, which was a crime until 1967. But while champerty still exists as a tort, a 2005 Court of Appeal decision in Arkin brought the sector into the mainstream by establishing that properly structured TPF does not infringe the rules. Thomas and the three Liberal Democrat peers who backed his LASPO amendment are not alone in their criticism; the US Chamber of Commerce, the world’s largest lobbying organisation, is also a fierce opponent of TPF, claiming that it fans the flames of ‘spurious’ litigation. Funders retort that if the US has a problem with excessive litigation, that is more down to its lack of an adverse costs rule than anything else. On this side of the Atlantic, funders have no interest in bringing cases that they do not think they will win, as they will be hit with the bill for the other side’s costs if they lose. Thomas’s call for government supervision of the sector largely relates to the potential expansion of TPF into the non-commercial arena, and in particular to divorce cases and personal injury. Clearly the argument for statutory regulation of funders is stronger where the litigant receiving their cash is an individual rather than a corporate entity. Divorce litigation is a small but growing area for TPF, with funders filling a gap left by private banks which have cooled off lending to claimants in high-end divorce disputes. However, as Leslie Perrin, chair of the new Association of Litigation Funders, points out, most funders prefer to steer clear of this litigation because ‘divorce is not economically rational behaviour, which funders have to have’. Funders also doubt that TPF will ever take off in personal injury. While personal injury claimants are usually on the winning side, and in severe cases they will receive substantial payouts, the amount that could be claimed by funders would be quite limited. A third-party investor’s percentage would have to be based on general damages alone, with no scope for them to take a slice of any future care award, meaning that the claims would not be economically viable for funders. last_img read more

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Let’s stop ignoring all this talent

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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Hansom: All or nothing

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Winning at Building Awards

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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Building 2012 Hero nominees: Eugene Oppong-Kwarteng

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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IAG ships Pagani supercar

first_imgGermany headquartered Globaltrans International Logistics coordinated the shipment of the EUR1 million (USD1.34 million) Huayra. The vehicle was flown on board an IAG Cargo B747-8 freighter service from Frankfurt-Main International airport to Hong Kong International airport. www.gloabltrans.euwww.iagcargo.comlast_img

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New show

first_imgKwasha! Theatre Company will stage Rhinoceros at the Magnet Theatre on Friday and Saturday November 8 and 9. First performed in 1959, Rhinoceros is the work of French-Romanian playwright Eugéne Ionesco, one of the foremost figures of the French avant-garde theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd. The play depicts an imaginary epidemic of “rhinoceritis”, a disease that frightens all the inhabitants of a city and soon transforms them into rhinoceroses. A metaphor for the rise of totalitarianism on the eve of World War II, it addresses the themes of conformism and resistance to political power. This production is directed by theatre duo Mahlatsi Mokgonyana and Billy Langa. The shows start at 6pm. Tickets are R60 and available through Webtickets.last_img read more